Press Release: Fryer puts people first

Campaigns are typically judged based on how much money they raise and elections become a fundraising contest. It’s one reason people hate politics so much. I’m not running that kind of campaign. First, I’ve spent my career leading nonprofit organizations and churches – I know how to make a dollar stretch. Second, I’m not wasting your money on polls that will tell me what I want to hear or expensive consultants who will tell me what to say. I’m putting people first.

Here’s my statement as I file my second campaign finance report with the Arizona Secretary of State’s office today:

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Newest Democrat in the governor’s race stays true to putting people first

Kelly Fryer her files second campaign finance report today

[Arizona] Democratic candidate for governor, Kelly Fryer, has filed her second campaign finance report with the Arizona Secretary of State. In a written statement, she said, “I’m staying true to my vision and my goals for this campaign – to make sure every voice gets heard and we put people first. I haven’t been spending my time on the phone making promises to wealthy donors. I believe Arizona belongs to everyone and, as governor, I’ll work for all the people – not just those with wealth and influence.” Fryer’s campaign reported raising a total of $160,000 and has almost $41,000 in cash going into the next quarter.

Kelly standing outside the Kaibab Paiute tribal administration office.
Kelly visited the Kaibab Paiute nation, which has 260 members and is located on the AZ-Utah border, this spring.

Fryer has spent the past 5 months traveling across Arizona. “I’m putting about 5000 miles a month on my little Prius,” she said. “We’re going to all 15 counties and I’m not just showing up to give a canned stump speech before I fly off to the next stop. It’s not a show. I’m building real relationships with folks, spending time, visiting local businesses and really listening to the concerns, questions and ideas people have.”

People in rural communities and small towns often tell Fryer they’ve never met a candidate for governor before. “The members of one tribal council told me, ‘No one ever comes here.’ I promised them this won’t be my last visit.” Fryer plans to use an RV to travel the state after she’s elected, in a kind of mobile governor’s office, and hold office hours and meet with people across Arizona.

When asked how she can win this election without raising millions of dollars, Fryer had a very simple answer. “First off, I’ve spent my career leading nonprofit organizations and churches – I know how to make a dollar stretch. Second, I’m not wasting my supporters’ money on polls that will tell me what I want to hear or expensive consultants who will tell me what to say. I’m spending money on people – on traveling all across Arizona, building relationships with people on social media, and on my staff, who are all working very hard for very little pay because they believe in this cause.”

Doug Ducey has far outraised all three Democrats in the governor’s race and has the backing of the NRA, ALEC and the Koch brothers.

“I think people are sick of politicians in both Parties who do the bidding of their donors,” Fryer said. “And I think people are sick of how much money is wasted on elections. It’s time to stop electing candidates who can sit the longest in a dark room dialing for dollars or who are willing to sell out to appease big donors. Let’s elect candidates with the best ideas, the strongest character and the leadership experience to actually get things done.”

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